A&P – Say hello to your deltoids.

oh your shoulders. Right. yeah. After the MAX REP OHS we did Wednesday, my shoulders are out for blood. I mean, they’re screaming worse than my ass and hammies after the lunges. Ech.

Your shoulders actually have TWELVE functions, which I’m sure you’re reminded of when you’ve had a particularly difficult WOD.

1. Shoulder (scapular) elevation – To Move the scapula upward, or superiorly, as in closer to the skull.
2. Shoulder (scapular) depression – To Move the scapula downward, or inferiorly, as in closer to the plantar surface of the feet.
3. Shoulder (scapular) protraction – Used when spreading the lats.
4. Shoulder (scapular) retraction – Performed when you squeeze the shoulder blades together
5. Shoulder flexion – Used when performing front raises.
6. Shoulder extension – To move the shoulder joint straight backwards. Similar to a hammering motion.
7. Shoulder internal rotation – Rotating the shoulder joint medially or toward the midline of the body.
8. Shoulder external rotation – Rotating the shoulder joint medially or toward the midline of the body.
9. Shoulder adduction – Adduction means to bring a body part closer to the midline or center of the body.
10. Shoulder abduction – Abduction means to take a body part away from the midline or center of the body.
11. Shoulder horizontal abduction – This is abduction in a horizontal or transverse plane, as in reverse dumbell flys.
12. Shoulder horizontal adduction – This is abduction in a horizontal or transverse plane, as in flat dumbell flys.


Your shoulders are capped by the three heads of the deltoid – the anterior, lateral, and posterior, which attach in the humerus. Your posterior head originates on the scapula, while the anterior and lateral head originate on the collarbone.
That twelve man list up there is basically saying, in a nutshell, your deltoids move your arm away from your body, in one fashion or another. YAY!
The anterior deltoid is primarily responsible for lifting the arm in front of your body, posterior lifts behind the body, and lateral moves your arm to the outside. Obviously these guys all work together to give us the massive range of motion we’re supposed to have in our shoulders.

Our biggest focus is in making sure your mobility is at optimal levels, as this is the easiest way to prevent injuries. Passthroughs, wall stretches, and certain yoga poses are all used to maintain and improve your ability to move your shoulders.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: